Intraoral autologous bone grafting represents a preferential choice for alveolar reconstruction prior to dental implant placement. Bone block harvesting guided by a computer-planned lithographic template is a novel and promising technique for optimizing the volume of harvested material, while controlling the osteotomy 3D position with respect to delicate anatomical structures. We provide a quantitative framework to non-invasively estimate the accuracy of this technique. In the proposed framework, the planned osteotomy geometry was compared to the real outcome of the procedure, obtained by segmentation of post-procedural cone beam computed tomography data. The comparison required the rigid registration between pre and post-procedural mandibular models, which was automatically accomplished by minimizing the sum of squared distances via a stochastic multi-trial iterative closest point algorithm. Bone harvesting accuracy was quantified by calculating a set of angular and displacement errors between the planned and real planes which characterized the excision block. The application of the framework to four cases showed its capability to quantify the tolerance associated with computer-guided bone harvesting techniques with submillimetric accuracy (<0.4 mm), within the limits of native image resolution. The validation methodology proved suitable for defining the safety margins of osteotomy surgical planning.

Assessing the accuracy of computer-planned osteotomy guided by stereolithographic template: A methodological framework applied to the mandibular bone harvesting

Cristoforetti, Alessandro;Masè, Michela;Ravelli, Flavia;Nollo, Giandomenico;Tessarolo, Francesco
2019

Abstract

Intraoral autologous bone grafting represents a preferential choice for alveolar reconstruction prior to dental implant placement. Bone block harvesting guided by a computer-planned lithographic template is a novel and promising technique for optimizing the volume of harvested material, while controlling the osteotomy 3D position with respect to delicate anatomical structures. We provide a quantitative framework to non-invasively estimate the accuracy of this technique. In the proposed framework, the planned osteotomy geometry was compared to the real outcome of the procedure, obtained by segmentation of post-procedural cone beam computed tomography data. The comparison required the rigid registration between pre and post-procedural mandibular models, which was automatically accomplished by minimizing the sum of squared distances via a stochastic multi-trial iterative closest point algorithm. Bone harvesting accuracy was quantified by calculating a set of angular and displacement errors between the planned and real planes which characterized the excision block. The application of the framework to four cases showed its capability to quantify the tolerance associated with computer-guided bone harvesting techniques with submillimetric accuracy (<0.4 mm), within the limits of native image resolution. The validation methodology proved suitable for defining the safety margins of osteotomy surgical planning.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11582/321872
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