Activity recognition from on-body sensors is affected by sensor degradation, interconnections failures, and jitter in sensor placement and orientation. We investigate how this may be balanced by exploiting redundant sensors distributed on the body. We recognize activities by a meta-classifier that fuses the information of simple classifiers operating on individual sensors. We investigate the robustness to faults and sensor scalability which follows from classifier fusion. We compare a reference majority voting and a naive Bayesian fusion scheme. We validate this approach by recognizing a set of 10 activities carried out by workers in the quality assurance checkpoint of a car assembly line. Results show that classification accuracy greatly increases with additional sensors (50% with 1 sensor, 80% and 98% with 3 and 57 sensors), and that sensor fusion implicitly allows to compensate for typical faults up to high fault rates. These results highlight the benefit of large on- body sensor network rather than a minimum set of sensors for activity recognition and prompts further investigation.

Activity recognition from on-body sensors by classifier fusion: sensor scalability and robustness

Farella, Elisabetta;
2007

Abstract

Activity recognition from on-body sensors is affected by sensor degradation, interconnections failures, and jitter in sensor placement and orientation. We investigate how this may be balanced by exploiting redundant sensors distributed on the body. We recognize activities by a meta-classifier that fuses the information of simple classifiers operating on individual sensors. We investigate the robustness to faults and sensor scalability which follows from classifier fusion. We compare a reference majority voting and a naive Bayesian fusion scheme. We validate this approach by recognizing a set of 10 activities carried out by workers in the quality assurance checkpoint of a car assembly line. Results show that classification accuracy greatly increases with additional sensors (50% with 1 sensor, 80% and 98% with 3 and 57 sensors), and that sensor fusion implicitly allows to compensate for typical faults up to high fault rates. These results highlight the benefit of large on- body sensor network rather than a minimum set of sensors for activity recognition and prompts further investigation.
978-1-4244-1501-4
978-1-4244-1502-1
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11582/215909
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